Trampolining FAQ

Trampolining FAQ with Frequently Asked Questions and Answers.

WHEN, HOW AND WHERE DID TRAMPOLINING ORIGINATE?
For hundreds of years there have been circus rebound acts. The modern trampoline was invented by George Nissen, USA in 1936 and spread to Europe in the late 1940s. The name "trampoline" comes from the Spanish word for a diving board.

ISN'T TRAMPOLINING DANGEROUS?
Well yes, if not done properly. Like all sports, trampolining has a very comprehensive set of safety regulations. It is recommended that activity should only occur under the supervision of persons who have obtained a trampolining coaching qualification and who will know about equipment standards and learning the skills involved. See the Safety page.

WHAT IS REQUIRED OF A COMPETITIVE TRAMPOLINE?
Power is required for top level jumping so that height, and therefore time is available to execute the double, triple and even quadruple somersaults and twists involved. This necessitates a frame that sets a bed a metre off the ground and that is approximately 2.14m (7 feet) by 4.28m (14 feet). The bed is made of material (nylon or string) of about 6mm (1/4 inches) width.

WHAT IS TRAMPOLINING LIKE?
Having your first go on the trampoline can provide a very strange experience - you feel as if you have been on a boat in a very stormy sea! Sooner or later however, you adapt and the up and down experience is very exhilarating. There are 30 or more different skills a beginner can master without having to do any up-side-down somersault movements.

WHAT MAKES A GOOD TRAMPOLINIST?
Trampolining demands sound technique with the performer being able to call on courage when learning new moves. The activity at the top level is a power sport, and only those with good innate special adaptability are likely to master the complexities and demands of competition.

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO GET TO COMPETITIVE STANDARD?
Some athletes learn very fast and are normally on the national open circuit within a year of beginning the sport. At youth international level most athletes will have 3-5 years experience in the sport, and at senior level 4-7 years.

HOW OFTEN DO TRAMPOLINISTS TRAIN?
As with most modern competitive athletes, advanced level trampolinists have full training programmes, with some having 1 or 2 training sessions of 1-3 hours duration 5-6 days each week. More junior members may have 2 training sessions of two hours a week. Beginners usually start out with 1 or 2 one-hour sessions a week.

WHAT IS THE BEST AGE FOR TRAMPOLINING?
The dynamic demands of the sport make it one for young people, and whilst people in their twenties have taken up the sport and achieved a good standard, the majority of stars are likely to have commenced their trampolining career in their pre-teenage years. The human body appears to be particularly receptive of the learning demands from the ages of 9-14 years, with the associated power demands coming into play from the age of about 12-14 years. Most trampolining clubs do not take children younger than five.

HOW HIGH DOES A PERFORMER JUMP?
International rules require that the minimum height of the ceiling in the competition hall be 8m (26 feet 3 inches) and athletes have been known to touch 9.14m (30 foot) ceilings with their finger tips! 5m is adequate for beginners. International athletes get high enough to spend nearly 2 seconds in the air, so a routine of 10 skills lasts approximately 20 seconds.

WHAT KIND OF SOMERSAULTS ARE THERE?
Somersaults are partial or complete rotations, forward or backwards around the hips area. Never, never ever call them Flips!! Somersaults are named by considering six things:
- The direction of rotation: forward or backward
- The amount of rotation: single, double, one and three quarters etc.
- The amount of twist: in multiples of a half
- The body shape in the air: straight, piked or tucked
- The take-off position: from feet, from seat, from front or from back.
- The landing position: to feet, to seat, to front or to back.
From this, we can see that there are hundreds of types of somersaults which are possible.

WHAT IS THE BASIC FORMAT FOR COMPETITIONS?
Competitive trampolining is a judged sport (like gymnastics or diving). The competitor performs two routines each of ten moves, with one mark awarded for each move performed perfectly. Deductions are made according to performance imperfections in each move. The resultant individual scores are then added up to give a total score out of ten for each routine. Marks are also added on for the degree of difficulty (DD or 'tariff') of the second routine. The difficulty of the routine is calculated by adding up the difficulties of each move in it.

IS TRAMPOLINING IN THE OLYMPICS?
Yes. The IOC Executive Board at the 106th Session held in Lausanne during September 1997 agreed that trampolining would feature in the Olympic Programme of the XXVII Olympiad in Sydney 2000. When George Nissen heard that gymnastic trampolining would make its Olympic debut in Sydney, he bought tickets to all the events and brought his daughter Dian to Sydney to watch! It was so great that he was able to do this before he passed away on April 7, 2010 in San Diego, having reached the grand old age of 96.




Blake-Gaudry

Blake-Gaudry

Blake-Gaudry

womens olympic tramp

mens olympic tramp

Trampolining sunset